Famous Quotes & Sayings

Carolyn G. Heilbrun Quotes & Sayings

Enjoy the top 26 famous quotes, sayings and quotations by Carolyn G. Heilbrun.

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Carolyn G. Heilbrun Quotes 1364526

Men are not listeners ... They hear what they expect to hear, or want to hear, or are certain they will hear, and women, being supple creatures trained to please, have often told them what we women knew would satisfy them. [p. 167] — Carolyn G. Heilbrun

Carolyn G. Heilbrun Quotes 504583

To continue what one had been doing
which was Dante's idea of hell
is, I came to see, and the vision frightened me, easy in one's sixties. — Carolyn G. Heilbrun

Carolyn G. Heilbrun Quotes 760115

We women have lived too much with closure: "If he notices me, if I marry him, if I get into college, if I get this work accepted, if I get this job"
there always seems to loom the possibility of something being over, settled, sweeping clear the way for contentment. This is the delusion of a passive life. When the hope for closure is abandoned, when there is an end to fantasy, adventure for women will begin. — Carolyn G. Heilbrun

Carolyn G. Heilbrun Quotes 2001935

If an animal is designed by nature to have claws it ought to keep them, and if men come with quirks that they are incapable of changing, well, a certain amount of quietude and even peace can be achieved by just realizing that it's all inherent in the beast. [p. 173] — Carolyn G. Heilbrun

Carolyn G. Heilbrun Quotes 400618

Today women live long into their children's adult lives ... too little is made of the pleasure we women feel in conversing with our grown children, and in allowing ourselves, from time to time, to think of them as friends. I have been fortunate in having children with whom conversation is possible; the sheerest pleasure here, for me, has been in meeting with them each alone ... [p. 185] — Carolyn G. Heilbrun

Carolyn G. Heilbrun Quotes 1481378

Ideas move fast when their time comes. — Carolyn G. Heilbrun

Carolyn G. Heilbrun Quotes 543563

Sadness such as mine is not depression; it can be blown away by an interesting conversation, a welcome telephone call, or a compelling idea for an essay or piece of fiction. It returns without evident cause, however obvious the cause of its banishment, and it belongs, I have come to suspect, to both youth and age, less frequently to the years between.[pp.177-178] — Carolyn G. Heilbrun

Carolyn G. Heilbrun Quotes 635961

What one remembers is, I think, a clue to what one wants to be. — Carolyn G. Heilbrun

Carolyn G. Heilbrun Quotes 141702

Power consists to a large extent in deciding what stories will be told. — Carolyn G. Heilbrun

Carolyn G. Heilbrun Quotes 324812

The antithetical or perhaps mirror image to sadness is the experience, similarly unique to one's late years, of a swift, mysterious wave of happiness, also causeless, but of much shorter duration. I cannot remember a time, before my sixties, when the consciousness of happiness would sweep over me and, like a shower of cold water when one is desperately overheated, offer me a passing sensation very close to glee.
Both sadness and fleeting happiness relate, I think, to mortality, to the consciousness of being old and of nearing the end of life ... these sensations ... surge up from the unconscious, to be a gift of long life or fortunate old age. Both sadness and happiness, but sadness more, are related to the fact that nothing of all this will endure for long. [p. 179] — Carolyn G. Heilbrun

Carolyn G. Heilbrun Quotes 384396

Is this true? Those who had world' enough, that is, those engaged in a demanding daily vocation, were short of time while those without regular obligations had more than sufficient time, but no world? — Carolyn G. Heilbrun

Carolyn G. Heilbrun Quotes 405783

The less androgynous the person, the likelier he or she was to be incapable of action if the appropriate action was not clearly delineated ... How many women there were ... who tore themselves or their families apart because they could not allow themselves any action or occupation that could appear manly, and might make their husbands appear less so. [pp. 132-133] — Carolyn G. Heilbrun

Carolyn G. Heilbrun Quotes 414882

Many of us feel alone and assaulted by the meaninglessness of what we are doing. But, at such times, we are doing; the problem is not a lack of activity with a point, but rather questions about the point of the activity. — Carolyn G. Heilbrun

Carolyn G. Heilbrun Quotes 717741

For those retired, with too much time and no world, a world must be found, and not necessarily one that is heavily populated. One can join a group or work alone; the essential ... is that the work be difficult, concentrated, and that definite progress can be measured ... the purpose ... is ... to maintain a carefully directed intensity ... Here the question is one of time, and to what all that remaining time should be devoted. [pp. 45-46] — Carolyn G. Heilbrun

Carolyn G. Heilbrun Quotes 871407

With solitude, however, fervently it is desired and embraced, comes loneliness. T. H White, the author, offered advice to those in sadness
learn something new. — Carolyn G. Heilbrun

Carolyn G. Heilbrun Quotes 872252

Ours is a long marriage, and we have found solitude together. [p. 23] — Carolyn G. Heilbrun

Carolyn G. Heilbrun Quotes 897278

The rare, delicate flavor of a life after retiring in one's sixties, whatever one has "retired" from, the pleasure I experienced beyond my job at Columbia, is a gift of life in the last decades. but it is not easily learned ... But sometimes, the only way to live is to get out, or at least seriously to contemplate getting out, doing the impossible,flinging the conventional tea. — Carolyn G. Heilbrun

Carolyn G. Heilbrun Quotes 1023544

Unfortunately, power is something that women abjure once they perceive the great difference between the lives possible to men and to women ... — Carolyn G. Heilbrun

Carolyn G. Heilbrun Quotes 1123324

All good marriages are remarriages. — Carolyn G. Heilbrun

Carolyn G. Heilbrun Quotes 1158783

Power is the ability to take one's place in whatever discourse is essential to action and the right to have one's part matter. — Carolyn G. Heilbrun

Carolyn G. Heilbrun Quotes 1472416

Professors of literature collect books the way a ship collects barnacles, without seeming effort. — Carolyn G. Heilbrun

Carolyn G. Heilbrun Quotes 1647082

It is noteworthy that few works of fiction make marriage their central concern. As Northrup Frye puts it, with his accustomed clarity: 'The heroine who becomes a bride, and eventually, one assumes, a mother, on the last page of a romance, has accommodated herself to the cyclical movement: by her marriage ... she completes the cycle and passes out of the story. We are usually given to understand that a happy and well-adjusted sexual life does not concern us as readers.' Fiction has largely rejected marriage as a subject, except in those instances where it is presented as a history of betrayal
at worst an Updike hell, at best when Auden speaks of it as a game calling for 'patience, foresight, maneuver, like war, like marriage.' Marriage is very different than fiction presents it as being. We rarely examine its unromantic aspects. — Carolyn G. Heilbrun

Carolyn G. Heilbrun Quotes 1656671

A literary academic can no more pass a bookstore than an alcoholic can pass a bar. — Carolyn G. Heilbrun

Carolyn G. Heilbrun Quotes 1917744

Women, I believe, search for fellow beings who have faced similar struggles, conveyed them in ways a reader can transform into her own life, confirmed desires the reader had hardly acknowledge
desires that now seem possible. Women catch courage from the women whose lives and writings they read, and women call the bearer of that courage friend. [p. 138] — Carolyn G. Heilbrun

Carolyn G. Heilbrun Quotes 2020948

The most potent reward for parenthood I have known has been delight in my fully grown progeny. They are friends with an extra dimension of affection. True, there is also an extra dimension of resentment on the children's part, but once offspring are in their thirties, their ability to love their parents, perhaps in contemplation of the deaths to come, expands, and, if one is fortunate, grudges recede. []p. 209] — Carolyn G. Heilbrun

Carolyn G. Heilbrun Quotes 2216025

But will anyone again look at that tree, read that poem, love a dog in quite my way? I am a particular and, despite the commonness of all people, a unique person in the way I perceive and think and appreciate, and I am sad that this particularity shall before too long be gone. This is not arrogance; it is the simple truth, known to anyone who has loved a person dead in the fullness of her life: what we miss is the particularity, that unique voice. [pp. 184-185] — Carolyn G. Heilbrun