Famous Quotes & Sayings

Margaret Caroline Anderson Quotes & Sayings

Enjoy the top 8 famous quotes, sayings and quotations by Margaret Caroline Anderson.

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It has been years since I have seen anyone who could even look as if he were in love. No one's face lights up any more except for political conversation. — Margaret Caroline Anderson

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People with heavy physical vibrations rule the world. — Margaret Caroline Anderson

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The great thing to learn about life is, first, not to do what you don't want to do, and, second, to do what you do want to do. — Margaret Caroline Anderson

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Art to me was a state: it didn't need to be an accomplishment. — Margaret Caroline Anderson

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Life seems to be an experience in ascending and descending. You think you're beginning to live for a single aim - ... for discovery of cosmic truths - when all you're really doing is to move from place to place as if devoted primarily to real estate. — Margaret Caroline Anderson

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I wasn't born to be a fighter. The causes I have fought for have invariably been causes that should have been gained by a delicate suggestion. Since they never were, I made myself into a fighter. — Margaret Caroline Anderson

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I have always suspected that too much knowledge is a dangerous thing. It is a boon to people who don't have deep feelings; their pleasure comes from what they know ... But this only emphasizes the difference between the artist and the scholar. — Margaret Caroline Anderson

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How can anyone be interested in war? - that glorious pursuit of annihilation with its ceremonious bellowings and trumpetings over the mangling of human bones and muscles and organs and eyes, its inconceivable agonies which could have been prevented by a few well-chosen, reasonable words. How, why, did this unnecessary business begin? Why does anyone want to read about it - this redundant human madness which men accept as inevitable? — Margaret Caroline Anderson